Seeding and Harvesting

You reap what you sow.

There’s a reason that phrase has been around since biblical times. It’s a universal truth that will always hold true. It doesn’t matter that you’re not a farmer either, because no matter what you do, career or personal life, what you put in is what you’ll get out.

Every farmer knows at least one important fact; in order to have a good harvest season, you must do your due diligence and seed. The problem with seeding is that you don’t see the fruits of your labor until some time after the hard work has been done. In fact, during a harvesting season, it’s easy to find comfort in reaping the benefits and not having to worry about your next harvest. Good farmers know that the seeding process is the most important part of the growing cycle. Why do you think metaphors like “you reap what you sow” have come to fruition?

When you start perfecting the art of Personal Branding, the truth of seeding and harvesting becomes much more apparent. Anyone in sales knows intuitively that they must make the cold calls if they’re to ever benefit from a client signing. Are you looking for a new job? Don’t be satisfied with the harvest of a couple interviews. Keep planting the seeds and get more interviews. Open up more opportunities and knock on more doors.

Because seeding is so labor intensive, most people don’t have the guts to keep at it. But if you continue to seed, you harvest will start compounding. Keep at it and don’t let up.

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4 thoughts on “Seeding and Harvesting

  1. Adam,

    This post really struck me. It’s so simple, yet so true – and something we (I) often forget. Seriously, I’m often so frustrated when I try something once it doesn’t work out for me. I have to remind myself to keep at it. It sounds cliche, I know, but I’ve always contended that cliches are what they are because they’re true! Anyway, thanks for the post. Sometimes you need a little encouragement.

    Like

  2. Thanks for the comment, Angela. A cliche is good advice people want to ignore 🙂

    But like you said, cliches can help you when you need a simple but powerful way of looking at things.

    Like

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